#EndPoliceBrutality: Faltz writes to Bukhari, calls for re-establishment of NHRC rule

Posted by on Oct 15, 2020, Under: News

#EndPoliceBrutality: Faltz writes to Bukhari, calls for re-establishment of NHRC rule

Popular Nigerian rapper Falz wrote a letter to President Muhammad Bukhari calling for the re-establishment of the NHRC’s governing body.

This comes amid protests by youth across the country calling for an end to police brutality.

Using her Instagram and Twitter accounts to share the letter, a law graduate and son of popular human rights activist Femi Falana, who was at the forefront of the protest, asked Bukhari to consider the letter urgent.

“@Muhammadubuhari, please treat this as urgent!” – she wrote.

Letter entitled REQUEST FOR THE RESTORATION OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION FOR THE EXECUTION OF ITS FUNCTIONS REGARDING HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS UNDER THE LAWS OF NIGERIA

“I am writing to Your Excellency on the above topic.

This has been brought to my attention through a statement from your Special Adviser for Media and Advertising, Femi Adeshin, that the federal government has approved the ENDSARS 5-point protest request made by friendly young Nigerians.

The statement went on to say that an independent investigation team would be set up to investigate human rights abuses by the late SARS and other segments of the Nigerian police force.

Quote from Adeshina’s statement: “The Forum accepts the creation of this independent group by the National Human Rights Commission within the next week.”

It is pertinent to note that Section 5 of the 2010 National Human Rights Commission (Amendment) Act empowers the National Human Rights Commission itself to receive complaints and investigate and recommend all alleged human rights violations in Nigeria. To the President.

The detailed and concise provisions of this section give the Commission on Human Rights the authority to investigate these cases on its own. The Commission does not need to create another group to carry out its functions.

More importantly, the National Human Rights Commission should have a Governing Council, in accordance with section 2 of the National Human Rights Commission (Amendment) Act, composed of the following persons:

(a) the President, who will be a retired judge of the Supreme Court of Nigeria or the Court of Appeal, or a retired State High Court judge;

(b) a representative of each of the following federal ministries:
(i) fairness; (ii) foreign affairs; iii) internal affairs;

(c) three representatives of human rights organizations registered in Nigeria;

(d) two legal professionals who must have at least ten years of work experience after qualification;

e) three media representatives, at least two of whom must be from the private sector;

f) three other persons representing different interests; is an

(g) the executive secretary of the Commission.
Currently, the National Human Rights Commission has been without a Governing Council since 2015 and is still without it. An unfortunate circumstance has led to the aggravation of human rights violations.

Under section 7 (3) of the National Human Rights Commission Act, the Executive Secretary of the Commission has no authority to act without the Governing Council.

In light of the above, I hereby call on His Excellency to immediately re-establish the National Human Rights Commission’s Governing Council and to do so in a public and transparent manner in order to restore the confidence of young Nigerians in the proposed police reform process.

Failure to comply with this rule will lead young Nigerians to believe that the continuing refusal to re-establish the National Human Rights Commission’s Governing Council is a deliberate attempt to make us believe that there is a genuine effort to reform the Nigerian police force, when in fact the opposite is true.

“I am confident that Your Excellency will grant my humble request to ensure that the fundamental human rights of all Nigerians are protected.
Best wishes,

“Folarin” Faltz “Falana”.


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